GPWA Times Magazine - Issue 6 - September 2008

Page Title | GPWA Times “As broadband penetration increases, people become more conscious about the cost of driving to real-world bingo halls. When they find that they can’t smoke when they get there, playing online bingo from home becomes more and more attractive.” – Warwick Bartlett, chairman of Global Betting and Gaming Consultants, who added that he estimates that by 2012, online bingo will account for 25 percent of the worldwide betting market. “A r band etr tion i r a s, peopl be e m r cons i s abo t t cost of driving to real- world bingo halls. When they find that they can’t smoke when they get there, playing onlin ingo fro home becomes more and more attractive.” – Warwick Bartlett, chairman of Global Betting and Gaming Consultants, who added that he estimates that by 2012, online bingo will account for 25 percent of the worldwide betting market. The GPWA sits down with CongressmanWexler and PPA chairman D’Amato “There is something horribly wrong when Australians spend an average of $7,200 per year on gambling, while they spend $4,300 on food.” – Family First leader Steve Fielding, after a study by the Australian Bureau of Statistics showed that Australians spend nearly twice as much on gambling as they do on food. (Stock & Land) “There is something horribly rong when Australians spend an average of $7,200 per year on gambling, while they spend $4,300 on food.” – Family First leader Steve Fielding, after a study by the Australian Bureau of Statistics showed that Australians spend nearly twice as much on gambling as they do on food. (Stock & Land) T he movement to repeal the Unlawful Inter- net Gambling Enforcement Act (UIGEA) and create a regulated online gambling indus- try suffered a setback in June when a bill that would have prevented UIGEA regulations from being implemented until the definition of illegal Internet gambling was clarified, failed to pass a House Financial Services Committee vote. In the wake of that setback, the Poker Play- ers Alliance (PPA) and Congressman Robert Wexler have been trying to rally poker players to make sure their voices are heard. Wexler and PPA chairman and former Sen. Alfonse D’Amato sat down with the GPWA’s Vin Naray- anan at the World Series of Poker to discuss the situation. Here are excerpts from that conversation: H.R. 5767 and the King amendment failed in committee. What’s the status of legislative efforts to repeal the UIGEA, and what happens next? Wexler: The (32-32) vote is the strongest support any Congress has shown for an online gambling measure. It shows that awareness of the absurdity of the status quo has never been greater. I’m confident, in the short term, we’ll be able to do something. Declaring poker a skill game and getting a regulated environment are more long-term goals. D’Amato: Congressman Spencer Bachus (R- Alabama) twisted the arms of five to six mem- bers who had indicated support for the (King) amendment and the need for clarity of what il- legal gambling was. There’s a good chance we’re going to re-introduce the measure before Con- gress goes into recess. When you sit down with people, what obstacles are you running into? D’Amato: One Congressman from New York told me that the NFL is pushing hard to keep the UIGEA in place. They want to make sure that sports betting does not spread on the Inter- net. That’s fine. But not for poker. The UIGEA allows for states to run on- line casinos and poker rooms if they restrict play to residents of that state. Recently, Native American tribes in California have been actively opposing attempts to formonline poker rooms in order to protect their revenue streams. What do you think of those attempts? Wexler: I support the right of all Americans to play onlinewhen andwhere theywant. This isn’t about special interest groups or lobbyists. This is about the right to play poker. D’Amato: Congressman Wexler is being very brave here. He’s fighting for the rights of individual Americans. Poker has been played in the White House, the Supreme Court, the Senate, and the House. It’s a game of skill, and the government should get off the backs of regular Americans and let them play wherever they want. — Vin Narayanan “There’s no question I stink. I’m not denying it. I do have an odor. I’ve been playing for 17 hours.” - Michael Wax, of New York City, who was asked to leave an Atlantic City Casino after many casino patrons who had been sitting “ h r ’s ti I tin . I’m n t in it.” — Michael Wax, of New York City, who was asked to leave an Atlantic City Casino after casino patrons sitting around him complained of the man’s odor. Wax left the casino immediately, but filed a formal complaint with the Casino Control Commission. “It makes fiscal sense to resolve [the question of ‘What is unlawful Internet gambling?’] before saddling the public, regulated industries, small businesses and courts with uncertain UIGEA law and regulation.” – A sentence from a letter sent by four Republican members of Congress in August to the heads of the Federal Reserve Board and US Treasury. “It fi l t l [t uesti f ‘What i l f l I t t li ’] f li t e li , re l t i t i , small businesses and courts with u certain UIGEA law a d regulation.” – A sentence from a letter sent by four Republican members of Congress in August to the heads of the Federal Reserve Board and U.S. Treasury.

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